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If you want to be like Steve Jobs, this is the one thing you must do

This article is about how steve jobs help you to keep your standards high? Change is at the heart of all innovation, but we see goods, technology, and the people and businesses who utilize them oppose it time and time again. You can’t reverse a decision after it’s been made. Unless, of course, you’re Steve Jobs.

I frequently consider what a variety of firms and institutions might be like if they were led by Steve Jobs, Apple’s legendary founder, and former CEO who died in 2011 at the age of 56.

Steve Jobs’s career is full of moments of daring, risk-taking, and change-making – even when it cost him time and money. He’s the antithesis of how many tech companies appear to work now, with plans baked in over many months, resulting in hardware and software with code that might carry legacy technology or outmoded thinking.

Change is at the heart of all innovation, but we see goods, technology, and the people and businesses who utilize them oppose it time and time again. You can’t reverse a decision after it’s been made.

Unless, of course, you’re Steve Jobs.

I frequently consider what a variety of firms and institutions might be like if they were led by Steve Jobs, Apple’s legendary founder, and former CEO who died in 2011 at the age of 56.

The Jobs Bible

Returning to Job’s Bible, also known as Walter Isaacson’s detailed and completely sanctioned (Jobs cooperated right up to his death) biography, is often enlightening for Jobs enthusiasts like myself. It’s full of stories of Jobs seeing a problem or making a mistake and then making the difficult decision to start over.

Jobs was a firm believer in this strategy, and as Isaacson points out, he frequently stated that “Everything he’d done well had necessitated a pause when he pressed the rewind button. He had to rework something that he learned wasn’t quite right in each situation.”

Perfectionism was evident in his product development, as was the fact that he never stopped thinking about the main products he was developing, such as the iPod and iPhone, even when he was sleeping.

That ethos was so powerful that it spread to Jobs’ subordinates, including Ron Johnson, Steve Jobs’ then-new head of retail, who awoke one morning to find that the first physical Apple Stores they were constructing were incorrectly organized around each product rather than the activities people might do with them. Jobs, understandably, not only admired but also encouraged the late-in-the-game epiphany, offering a key insight into his own product-development strategy: “We’ve only got one shot to get it right.”

Jobs lobbied to incorporate a more powerful Motorola CPU (the Motorola 68000 instead of the weak 6809) than what was in the initial spec in the early days of the Mac development.

Brutal truths

The revelations were sometimes quick and, to be honest, a little harsh. Amit Chaudhary, a former Apple employee, once told a story about the early days of iPod development.

The prototype was nearly complete, but Jobs wanted it to be much smaller. It couldn’t be made any smaller, according to the engineers. Jobs is alleged to have taken the prototype, submerged it in a fish tank, and explained, as air bubbles rose from the submerged device, “The bubbles you see are air bubbles. That indicates that there is room inside. Reduce the size.”

Jobs’ flashes of creativity affected everyone.

Jobs contacted Chief Designer Jony Ive and stated, “I didn’t sleep last night because I realised that I just don’t love it,” according to Isaacson’s book, as Apple was finishing the first iPhone.

The screen had become a stumbling block. It was intended to be the star of the iPhone show because there was no physical keypad, but the Corning Gorilla Glass display and the metal chassis were competing.

I agreed, and soon the glass was pushed to the device’s edges, forcing the antenna to be reworked, as well as the circuit board and CPU arrangement.

Clarity
Jobs was never indecisive when it came to pressing the pause button. It was a moment of clarity. Few persons before or since have had such a clear vision of the consumer electronics sector and an intuitive feel of what consumers will want and adore – even before they did.

In general, he foresaw what they could dislike and was always on the lookout for ways to avoid making poor decisions.

The one case of this that has nothing to do with technology always makes me laugh. Steve Jobs founded Pixar and oversaw the production of the company’s first feature film, Toy Story. However, he worked on the film with Disney and, in particular, impresario Jeffrey Katzenberg.

Katzenberg reportedly had a much more mean-spirited and villainous Woody in mind. That direction almost derailed the project, with Katzenberg hating an early cut (mostly his own fault) and halting production. Jobs knew Katzenberg was wrong and did what he could, at his own personal expense, to keep the project going but with a much kinder and palatable Woody.

The Jobs way:

  • Not settling for good enough
  • Never let a bad idea go through
  • Making changes even if they cost you time and money
  • Believing in your own instincts
  • Making products that feel special

What do you think?

Written by Emma Ava

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